Advocating

Speaking up and speaking out on behalf of women ministers.

Learn More

Connecting

Joining women and men together in partnership with God. 

Learn More

Networking

Building bridges of service for women in ministry.

Learn More

Our Vision

Baptist Women in Ministry will be a catalyst in Baptist life, drawing together women and men, in partnership with God, to illuminate, advocate, and nurture the gifts and graces of women.

On the BWIM Blog


THIS IS WHAT A MINISTER LOOKS LIKE: Joy Yee

THIS IS WHAT A MINISTER LOOKS LIKE: Joy Yee

Every Friday, Baptist Women in Ministry introduces an amazing minister, and today, we are pleased to introduce you to Joy Yee. Joy, tell us about your current ministry? I serve as the lead pastor at Nineteenth Avenue Baptist Church in San Francisco, California, where I have been since 2005 after a church merge. The church is small, diverse, and filled with wonderful people I love. What have been some of the challenges you have faced in your ministry journey? There have been several major challenges in my ministry journey. The first was overcoming the prevalent idea in Baptist life at the time that women should not be senior pastors. I felt this challenge at the national, state, local, and church family level, with the latter being the most difficult to handle because I was in the community that had raised and nurtured me in faith. A  second challenge I have faced was leading a church people away from Robert’s Rules toward a discernment model for decision-making. Acts 15 become our model for conversation, prayer, scripture, and trust in God’s Spirit to lead within the wisdom of the community. This shift took about five years to be fully engaged and shaped. A third challenge for me has been figuring out how to be and do church in an urban area that is filled with people who are open to spirituality but distrust Christianity for one reason or another. A  fourth challenge is a current one. A mentor shared with me once that in order to pastor long term, we need to “reinvent” ourselves two or three times. We cannot stay... read more
Finding a Ministry Position, Part 7: Your Search and Social Media by Pam Durso

Finding a Ministry Position, Part 7: Your Search and Social Media by Pam Durso

Social media is our new reality–and it matters more than you might imagine in a ministry search process. Your Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts are THE FIRST significant introduction most search committees will have to you. They will read your cover letter, glance at your resume, skim over your references, AND then head straight to Google to see where all they can find you. And when they find your account or accounts, the committee will look at ALL your photos, read through your statuses, check out your comments . . . so if you have a social media footprint, YOU need to go and review what you have posted and determine whether you have work to do, cleaning up your pages, deleting pictures, or adjusting your privacy settings. While social media is wonderful for sharing yourself and your views, the truth is that your postings can scare off the committee very easily. If you are applying for youth ministry positions and you have dozens of photos of you at college keg parties, a good many committees will quickly deposit your resume in the trash. If you are hoping to be a children’s minister and you have posted photos of yourself in revealing beach wear or super short shorts, some committees will question your professionalism and decide you might not be the appropriate one to nurture their preschoolers. If you are searching for a pastorate and you have posted strong political statements, the committee might deem you to be too intense or too inflammatory to lead their congregation and cross your name off the list. For those who are overly... read more
Truth and Grace When “You Wouldn’t Understand” by Carol Harston

Truth and Grace When “You Wouldn’t Understand” by Carol Harston

When the words fall forth in the conversation, the relationship comes to a screeching halt. The words lay bricks between us. They form a wall through which hands cannot hold, eyes cannot meet, and words cannot transform. “You haven’t _______. You wouldn’t understand.” insert any number of life-stages or experiences: served as a minister in a congregation, graduated from seminary, cared for aging parents, struggled with depression, experienced discrimination, been married, been divorced, had a child, had two children, had three children… I felt the words the strongest when I entered into community with women who had children. It seemed as if there was a club of motherhood that was surrounded by women with bows that shot arrows of “you wouldn’t understand,” as if to protect the well-crafted and culturally-celebrated image of “the mother” who is ragged and worn, but a celebrated servant to the glory of her children. When my belly grew for the first time, I began to witness a parting in the artillery. I no longer felt the arrows. Now the arrows were turned to invitations. My first arrived, and I was officially inaugurated in. An invitation into the club was nice, but I found that there were always further levels of initiation. “You have an infant still. You wouldn’t understand.” “You don’t have two kids. You wouldn’t understand.” When the second arrived, I found more grace in myself for them. In hindsight, one child seemed like a piece of cake. No children seemed like vacation. What had once felt like an assault on my worth as a woman now became a tape that played in... read more
Tuesday Prayer from Baptist Women in Ministry

Tuesday Prayer from Baptist Women in Ministry

Come, Holy Spirit, fill my heart with your holy gifts. Let my weakness be penetrated with your strength this very day, that I may fulfill all the duties of my state conscientiously, that I may do what is right and just. Assist me, O Holy Spirit, in all my trials of life, enlighten me in my ignorance, advise me in my doubts, strengthen me in my weakness, help me in all my needs, protect me in temptations, and console me in afflictions. Graciously hear me, O Holy Spirit, and pour your light into my heart, my soul, and my mind. Assist me to live a holy life, and to grow in goodness and grace. Amen.   Adapted from Gregory F. Augustine Pierce’s A Catholic Prayer Companion: A Heartwarming Collection of Thirty Best-Loved Catholic... read more
Psalm 92: Transformative Thanksgiving by Alicia Porterfield

Psalm 92: Transformative Thanksgiving by Alicia Porterfield

“It is good to sing praise to the Lord, to sing praises to your name, O Most High.” Remember gratitude journals? You were supposed to list five thankfuls each night. Penning the day’s gifts focused us on the blessings in our lives–rather than what had gone wrong. I think I kept one for a week or so. The act of thanksgiving can be life-changing, or at least perspective-changing. This is especially true for those who like to check off our to-dos and keep moving forward. Life and ministry are full of rabbit trails and derailments. Most days don’t actually go as planned, at least in my life. The psalmist declares, “It is good . . . to declare your steadfast love in the morning and your faithfulness by night ”(v. 2). Personally, I do much better with the morning part. In the morning, the day is, as Anne of Green Gables would say, new “with no mistakes in it . . . Yet.” By the end of the day, those morning aspirations are bedraggled with a big dose of reality. That’s where developing a habit of declaring God’s “faithfulness by night” comes in. Whether in prayer and reflection or a journal or a quiet conversation, I need to remember the gifts of each day before I lay my head on the pillow. I need to sing for joy, gladdened by God’s work in our lives and in the world (v. 4), even if it’s the world’s shortest song. Ending the day with thanksgiving refocuses me on what is most important: loving God and loving my neighbor as myself. It... read more
DEAR ADDIE: I’m Ready to Be a Mom

DEAR ADDIE: I’m Ready to Be a Mom

Dear Addie, I am a thirty-seven-year-old single minister, serving on the staff of a large church. I have never been married and am not currently dating. And to be honest, I don’t see marriage in my future. I have made peace with my singleness—with one exception. I desperately want to mother a child. My ministry position is as secure as any ministry position ever will be. I have saved a chunk of money by being frugal and careful, and I am in good physical shape. In recent months, I have read books, explored websites, and had conversations about single parenting, and I am ready to move ahead with this idea. I know that adoption is probably the best route for me to pursue as a single minister mom, but in my heart, I really want to carry and birth my baby. I also know that having a pregnant unmarried minister (even one who openly confesses her use of artificial insemination) will be difficult for my congregation to accept. How do you think I can start a conversation about a potential pregnancy with my fellow church staff members and leaders in the church? Or do you think I even should start this conversation? I love my church, love my ministry—I don’t want to shock, offend, or hurt them. I am so conflicted! Your wise words, Dear Addie, would be appreciated! -My Biological Clock is Ticking LOUDLY   Dear Conflicted, The decision to become a mother is a highly personal one, yet one that has enormous implications for you personally and professionally. Your calling should figure into the calculus of your... read more

Make a Significant Difference

Baptist Women in Ministry is committed to advocating for, connecting to, and networking with

Baptist women in ministry and those who care about them. Your support makes a significant difference!

 

GIVE TO BWIM

Contact Us

Mailing Address:

Baptist Women in Ministry
PO Box 941294
Atlanta, GA 31141

Physical Address:

3001 Mercer University Dr.
Atlanta, GA 30341
(404) 513-6022

 

Logo BWIM high resolution just logo

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from Baptist Women in Ministry.

You have Successfully Subscribed!